Adult Colouring Course

Shading Techniques

 

1. Hatching
Hatching is achieved by using angular lines (running parallel to each other) to represent shading.
Start by holding the pencil still in your hand and moving your wrist to achieve short sharp lines, or the movement of your elbow to achieve straight long lines.

2. Cross-Hatching
Is achieved again by the use of angular lines (at right angles). The closer the lines are together the darker the area will appear to be, the further apart the lighter the shading. A combination of hatching and cross hatching can be used for differing effects.

3. Tonal/Pressure/Blending
Is achieved in a variety of ways. Firstly through applying different levels of pressure while shading to achieve lighter and darker tones, the use of different pencils (with softer and harder lead), or a rubber can be used to apply light sources on a complex object.

4. Circulism
Is achieved through drawing circles in an area to achieve tones and areas of shading. The greater the volume of circles the darker that area will appear, using smaller and larger circles can give different tonal effects.

 

5. Stippling

Stiplling is a shading technique that uses just dots that give a softer look. It takes time to practice. Remember that its not how hard you press down with the pencil/crayon but how close you put the dots together if you are wanting to create a darker shaded area.

Shading Techniques

 

It's always a good idea to practice any new colouring technique on plain paper, before attempting it on one of your more expensive coloring books if you own one. This way, if things don't work out like you planned, your pages won't be ruined. In addition, please keep this in mind. Not every medium works with every technique. Markers work better with some things and crayons and coloured pencils work better with others. The best thing to do is have fun and experiment. Chances are, you'll be pleasantly surprised with your results.

Providing you have some colouring pencils at the ready it will be a good idea to grab some blank paper, A4 printing paper will be just fine for now if you don't want to invest in specific types of paper. Read the information below and watch the 3 video tutorials at the bottom of this page and then have a go at recreating the following shading techniques.

 

One of the most successful ways to practice is to use two contrasting colors. Use the first colour to shade from left to right. Use the second colour to shade in the opposite direction.

 

The way you hold the pencil makes a difference. Position it so that most of the tip is in contact with the paper, which makes the colour smoother and helps to reduce the possibility of pencil lines. This is accomplished by holding the pencil somewhat sideways.
Instead of using white and black, to do the shadowing, it's better to use colours like dark blue and purple for the dark colours. Use light yellows, for the highlights. Try to avoid rubbing the colours, in effort to create the shading you desire. This has a tendency to smear everything together.
 

1. Hatching
Hatching is easy-peasy. It is achieved by using angular lines (running parallel to each other) to represent shading.
Start by holding the pencil still in your hand and moving your wrist to achieve short sharp lines, or the movement of your elbow to achieve straight long lines.

2. Cross-Hatching
Is achieved again by the use of angular lines (at right angles). The closer the lines are together the darker the area will appear to be, the further apart the lighter the shading. A combination of hatching and cross hatching can be used for differing effects.

3. Tonal/Pressure/Blending
Is achieved in a variety of ways. Firstly through applying different levels of pressure while shading to achieve lighter and darker tones, the use of different pencils (with softer and harder lead), or a rubber can be used to apply light sources on a complex object.

4. Circulism
Is achieved through drawing circles in an area to achieve tones and areas of shading. The greater the volume of circles the darker that area will appear, using smaller and larger circles can give different tonal effects.

 

5. Stippling

Stippling is a shading technique that uses just dots that give a softer look. It takes time to practice. Remember that its not how hard you press down with the pencil but how close you put the dots together if you are wanting to create a darker shaded area.

Move the cursor away from the video players whilst playing. Doing this will reveal a scrolling information bar at the bottom of the player.

Before proceeding to the next module why not click the 'Back' button at the top of this page and print out the same mandala you previously coloured in but this time use the techniques you have just learnt. Lets see if they look any different. You can always print one of the other three designs if you don't want to do the same design twice, again if you don't have a printer create another doodle or use another colouring page from a book you may of purchased.